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Posts Tagged ‘megapixels’

Your First Home Security System – Part 2: IP Camera Features In-Depth

Tuesday, December 15th, 2015

Hikvision DS-2CD2142FWD-I 4mm 4MP WDR Fixed Dome Network Camera

In this second part of our multi-part series on setting up your first home security system, we’ll be building on the basics we covered last week and go more in-depth on the different IP camera features we should be considering when purchasing our system, and the options that are available. We’ll cover camera resolution, frame-rate, and infrared.

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The New Hikvision R6 Family of 4MP IP Cameras

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

Hikvision have recently released a new range of 4MP cameras – the R6 family line – which expands upon their existing 2-line range with better WDR resolutions and support for their new H.264+ video compression codec.

We gave the new DS-2CD2742FWD-I (4MP) model a test in the office against the older DS-2CD2732F-I (3MP), and the results are dramatic as you can see here for yourself! It performed far better at all WDR settings and provided a much clearer picture of our strongly back-lit subject.

This new range also supports Hikvision’s new H.264+ Smart Codec which provides a much better compression rate of high definition footage than the previous H.264 Codec. As shown in a recent video, this improvement can save you up to 66% space when compared with the previous iteration, which can obviously go a long way to help reduce the cost of on-going data storage.

The full range of 4MP Hikvision R6 cameras are now available at our webshop. Be sure to check out our YouTube channel for more regular content including product demonstrations, testing, and unboxings!

7-megapixel, 180-degree HD network camera

Friday, January 9th, 2009

'Digital Window' D7 Camera from Scallop Imaging

HD Network Camera delivering 180° seven megapixel images!

We found this over at Geek.com:

The D7 is a 7 megapixel camera capable of processing 100 megapixels of information per second. It also doesn’t have just one lens, instead incorporating 5 separate lenses allowing for a full 180-degree capture at 15fps.

As well as the high resolution capture, the camera doesn’t need a connection to a power point as it is powered over Ethernet. That means with a single cable you can have a very wide-angled security camera capturing HD footage.

Great for wide-angle CCTV surveillance!

Scallop’s Press Release says:

A single 180° Digital Window camera feeding into one DVR port can replace multiple conventional cameras for most security applications, enabling significant cost savings and faster ROI upon deployment. Customers benefit from an extraordinary increase in capability, at lower cost and lower bandwidth requirements than present IP camera solutions. The Digital Window camera delivers a down-sampled 180° situational awareness view simultaneously with a full resolution zoom window.

Digital Window also offers:
• Excellent facial recognition, in place of existing wide angle solutions that produce only a blur;
• Instant pan and zoom, with no camera movement;
• No fisheye distortion or blind spots;
• paired units can provide a 360° field of view;
• Compatible with video analytics software;
• Power over Ethernet (PoE);
• H.264 image compression; and
• 15 fps video streaming with seven megapixels of detail over standard 10/100 Ethernet networks.

Visit the Scallop Imaging website

Sanyo HD 4000 Four Megapixel Full HD CCTV Camera promo site

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008

Sanyo VCC-HD4000 4 Megapixels Full HD Network CameraSanyo have launched a new 4MP HD CCTV camera – their model VCC-HD4000.

They’ve built a rockin’ promo website to launch this new IP CCTV camera (switch your speakers on!).

It’s got a great specification, including:

  • 4 megapixel camera
  • built-in 10X optical zoom lens with auto-focus
  • 16X digital zoom in addition to the optical zoom
  • Day/Night capability with IR cut-filter
  • Dual stream H.264 and JPEG
  • POE (Power Over Ethernet) ready
  • SD memory card slot for video storage at the camera
  • USB port for direct attached USB HDD
  • HDMI port

Sanyo VCC-HD 4000 IP CCTV Camera now available to buy online from our webshop.

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Who buys IP CCTV?

Thursday, December 4th, 2008

IP CCTV has been around for a number of years now and it’s interesting to just pause and consider who is committing to it as their chosen surveillance technology.

It’s interesting to note that more and more of the big system users, with the resources to carry out in-depth trials, and the experience of previous technologies are now rolling-out IP CCTV solutions at their sites. IKEA, John Lewis, casinos, shopping centres and ports all feature amongst this set of big customers that have switched to IP CCTV.

In the world of smaller surveillance systems, there are two clear categories of customers that select IP CCTV:

CCTV Upgraders

People who already have traditional analogue CCTV systems and want something better. They’ve had incidents, they’ve reviewed recordings, they would like to be able to ‘see more’ next time there’s an incident …

The Tech Savvy

People who ‘get it’ – they have their finger on the pulse of technology, they check lots of websites, they consider and compare different manufacturers, they read the specifications on the datasheets, they understand megapixels, bandwidth, gigabytes and lux levels, they call and discuss their application …

Who doesn’t buy IP CCTV?

Basically, the price conscious consumer. They know (or have been told) that they must have CCTV. They look for the cheapest solution to tick that box, they don’t consider the image quality, they don’t read specifications. They don’t profess to understand analogue or ‘digital’ CCTV. They may have been told (by a friend, or the first installer that they spoke to) that they need a DVR. They are often keen to get the job done, and they just buy cheap.

Of course, these people become the ‘CCTV upgraders’ of the future … because once they have committed to the co-ax cabling and BNC connectors of traditional CCTV they’re not going to be able to do a lot to improve their system by simply changing components, and in due course they are quite likely to upgrade to IP CCTV …